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Full text of "NightRider"

170

pull a window down, maybe. But you just let somebody move
round downstairs, even on tiptoe, or turn a doorknob, and,
by God, Fm wide awake. And it just seems like I know what
it was waked me up. Just like a voice told me-----"

" Papa's like a cat," Lucille Christian interrupted, " a big,
red, old tomcat. With one ear bitten off," she added.

" Now you take that other night when you spent the night
here, and I came out in the hall and talked to you. I bet I
knew you was coming before a dog ever got wind of you. I
woke up, and I knew, just like a voice said, Somebody's riding
over that little plank bridge on the pike. And I said to
myself, There's Perse coming now. Then, pretty quick, old
Miss Belle Cunningham—now she's got as good a nose as
any dog I ever took off after-----"

"It's a touching habit," Lucille Christian interrupted,
"papa has of naming dogs after young ladies he used to
admire when he was young. He keeps their memory green."

" Get me some coffee, Sukie," he said, and shoved the cup
toward her. She rose to obey him. "And Miss Belle
Cunningham, now," he resumed, " she started to barking, and
the others took it up. But I knew it long before that. Just
like a voice spoke In the dark when your mare set a hoof on
that bridge,"

Lucille Christian placed the cup before her father. " I was
awake, too, before all of papa's old loves started to give
tongue," she said, while she leaned over to sugar his coffee for
him. " But I didn't hear the bridge, or didn't notice. Then I
heard papa's door screak when he went out in the hall, and
I saw the light from the hall under my door."

Mr. Munn wondered which room was hers, the one directly
before which they had stood that night?

" You all certainly found a lot to talk about that time of
night," she remarked. She returned to her chair.

" Sure," Mr. Christian agreed, and lifted his cup.

After he was in bed, it occurred to Mr. Munn that the real
reason Lucille Christian stayed up was not to make coffee for
her father. She wouldn't sit up to all hours for that, and iie